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The Remarkable Memory
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Tanzania is has wonderful adventure experience from top to the bottom

Stunning Beaches
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Tanzania has wonderful beaches where you can undergo a lot of activities, like deep diving along coast of Mafia while watching dolphins, meet locals

The Roof of Africa

Tanzania has wonderful beaches where you can undergo a lot of activities, like deep diving along coast of Mafia while watching dolphins, meet locals

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It would be easy to reduce an introduction to Tanzania to a list of facts and figures. This vast East African country really is a statistician’s dream: within its borders lie Africa’s highest and fifth-highest mountains, the world’s largest intact volcanic caldera, Africa’s most famous national park and the world’s largest game reserve, as well as portions of the three most expansive lakes on the continent, one of which is the second-largest freshwater body in the world, another the second-deepest.


ADVENTURE GALLERY

WILDLIFE EXPERIENCE

When it comes to wildlife, Tanzania is practically without peer. An unprecedented 25% of the country is protected in national parks and other conservation areas. Together, these an estimated 20% of Africa’s large mammal population, and one of them plays host to the singular spectacle of an annual migration of some two million wildebeest, zebra and gazelle. Furthermore, Tanzania has recently overtaken Kenya as boasting Africa’s second-longest bird checklist (after the Democratic Republic of Congo), with more than 1,130 bird species recorded, and new endemics being discovered all the time. And as if that were not enough, the three great lakes that lie along Tanzania’s borders vie with each other for the honor of harboring the world’s greatest diversity of fish species.

BEST TIME TO VISIT

For  those  seeking exclusivity at a  price, the southern and western  tourist circuit, which includes Mafia Island, Selous Game Reserve, and  Udzungwa, Ruaha, Mikumi, Mahale, Gombe Stream, Katavi and Rubondo Island national parks, has generally retained a real wilderness atmosphere, offering quality lodge accommodation and (mostly) safari packages at a price comparable to an lodge safari on the more popular northern safari circuit. And make no mistake, these are wonderful reserves, forming a safari circuit that many African countries would kill for. Their relative obscurity is largely due to the fact that they lie in the same country as the renowned Serengeti ecosystem.

Broadly speaking,tourism arrivals are highest  during the northern hemisphere winter,while the low season runs from the end of the Easter weekend until the end of September,though this is distorted by a surge of tourism over June and July, when the wildebeest migration is on in the Serengeti.

The rainy season between November and April is a good time to visit the Serengeti; it is when the countryside is greenest, and it offers the best bird watching, with resident species supplemented by a number of Palaearctic and intra-African migrants. The rainy season is hotter than the period May to October, but in most parts of the country, this will only be by a matter of a couple of degrees. The seasonal difference in temperature is most noticeable along the humid coast, which can be rather uncomfortable in the hot months. The wettest months are March and April, when parts of the country may experience storms virtually on a daily basis.

The dry season, in particular March and September, offers the best trekking conditions on Mount Kilimanjaro and Meru. The dry season is the best time for hiking generally, and for traveling in parts of the country with poor roads. Temperatures at the coast tend to be more bearable during the dry season, which is also considerably safer than the wet season in terms of malaria and other  mosquito-borne diseases

When it comes to wildlife, Tanzania is practically without peer. An unprecedented 25% of the country is protected in national parks and other conservation areas. Together, these an estimated 20% of Africa’s large mammal population, and one of them plays host to the singular spectacle of an annual migration of some two million wildebeest, zebra and gazelle. Furthermore, Tanzania has recently overtaken Kenya as boasting Africa’s second-longest bird checklist (after the Democratic Republic of Congo), with more than 1,130 bird species recorded, and new endemics being discovered all the time. And as if that were not enough, the three great lakes that lie along Tanzania’s borders vie with each other for the honor of harboring the world’s greatest diversity of fish species.

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